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Framing Tips by EC Sullivan

Fine Art by EC Sullivan

Fine Art by EC SullivanIf you have plenty of money, go to a frame shop and get your new painting custom framed. Always the best to let professionals do it. Mom and Pop frame stores tend to be less expensive than Hobby Lobby or Michaels or other big chains.

If you want to do it yourself, here are some tips.

Take your painting to a store whenever they are having a sale. Hobby Lobby has sales on frames about every other week. Michaels, too. Another good place to go is Jerry’s Artarama if there is one near you – they carry good frame packages (means you get the frame, glass, backing board and hanging stuff altogether) and pretty good prices. Or order online.

Pick a frame that your painting will fit into. Pick a piece of mat board of a color that goes well with your painting (this is why you bring the painting to the store with you). Cut the mat board to fit in the frame and mount your painting on top of the mat board using acid free double-sided tape. The deckled (ragged) edges of the painting will be showing, but I personally like that. When you pick a frame, you might have it an inch bigger than the painting, or 3 inches or 2 inches height-wise and 3 inches length-wise. Just make sure the picture fits into the frame with room to spare, and the mat board will take up the rest of the frame area.

If you do not like it get someone at the store you are in to cut a mat for you.

Unless you bought the package frame deal at Jerrry’s, you now need glass or plexi to fit into the frame to protect the painting. You can get non-glare glass or plexi, which is the best, but more expensive than plain old glass. You can get the frame store to cut it for you. It’s cheaper to get glass or plexi at Lowes or Home Depot and they also will cut it for you.

Lastly you need a backing board. Foam core is a good backing board. If you bought a whole sheet of mat board, you can use another piece of mat board.

To put it altogether, use glaziers points. You push them into a wooden frame. I have a frame gun for these, but that’s a huge expense and not needed unless you are doing a lot of framing. You can also use a staple gun – not very professional, but nobody is going to see the back.

To hang it, use a piece of framing wire and eye screws or D rings. You can get little picture hanging kits at craft stores or hardware stores that has everything you need to make a nice wire hanger.

If you’re in Hobby Lobby, check the frames clearance section – these are custom frames that customers have rejected. I’ve often found one that fits the painting I want to mount, and the price goes down as the year goes by – in December they are 90% off. These frames are not in the framing part of the store – they are off somewhere else. Ask where they are.

Call or email me if you have questions.

Elizabeth Sullivan
512 431 7756
ecsullivanart@aol.com
http://wildspiritartworks.com/

© Copyright 2020 EC Sullivan. All Rights Reserved.

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Chuck Rosenthal Fine Artist

Chuck Rosenthal Fine ArtistI started studying art in 1963 with an extraordinary illustrator/fine artist named Morton Roberts at the National Academy of Design in NYC. I soon forgot about commercial art. Roberts fired up my desire to paint and succeed as a fine artist and I have never really left that path. But I did change my viewpoint on style and content. Roberts untimely death was a huge tragedy and a great disappointment for me because I believed he had so much to teach. Roberts was followed by abstract artist, Hugh Gumpel and under Hugh I won the Dr. Al Weil student prize at the National Academy. Eventually I began to look around for another teacher and found Daniel Greene, an outstanding portrait painter and studied with him for the next couple of years. Dan helped me to get a scholarship membership in the Salmagundi Club where I managed to gain an honorable mention in their scholarship members’ exhibition and competition.

Pears with Black Grapes fine art by Chuck RosenthalDuring this time I became aware of and became an intense admirer of the work of still-life artist and portrait painter David Leffel. I sought to present my images in a similar light. I actually studied with Leffel for a couple of months in his New York City studio, but it wasn’t enough time to grasp where he was coming from and how he made his decisions and drew his conclusions, so I pretty much had to teach myself.

Pears with Black Grapes Still Life by Chuck RosenthalTechnique had always been very important to me and I originally did dead-color preparations for my paintings, much as the Old Masters did (dead-color paintings are monochromatic paintings over which colors are glazed), but I became more interested in tonal results rather than the sculptural results achieved by 17th century painters. I was probably somewhat influenced by Impressionism and definitely by modern-day tonalist work. I have become fascinated with the effects of light, particularly as an object emerges from shadow into light. I seek to represent what I see, to the best of my ability, in terms of light and atmosphere.

I have managed to achieve some degree of artistic success. In 2010 I was accepted as a member of the Oil Painters of America and was a finalist in American Artist Magazine’s annual cover competition.

Find out more about Chuck Rosenthal at Chuck Rosenthal Fine Art

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Fine Art by Rosalinde Reece

I have been drawing and painting since I could hold a crayon. It’s what I do and what I love doing.

Rosalinde ReeceI took my first art class in a garage in Hamden, Connecticut, as the only child in an adult class. We worked with oils and our first challenge was to create perfect sphere. Next assignment was a still life, set up by the teacher, containing every imaginable texture, shape, color etc. Once those two assignments were done flawlessly, we were allowed to do whatever we wanted. My teacher was apparently following Picasso’s philosophy “Learn the rules like a professional so you can break them like an artist.” I’m pretty sure it worked!

I had a series of amazing teachers. I had my first major sale at 17, to the IBM Museum of Young Artists. It was on display there until I passed the age of young artists. It was then sold to a private collector. I had my first one woman show when I was 21.

Fine Art by Rosalinde Reece. © 2016 Rosalinde Reece. All Rights Reserved.I attended Parsons, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, the New School in NYC. At 17, I was lucky enough to be introduced to Bill and Elaine DeKooning, incredibly successful artists, who encouraged me to grow and expand as an artist.

My purpose as an artist is to make the world a little brighter, a little happier, a little more fun. People who see the beauty and joy in the world around them WILL work to cure its ills so that beauty and joy becomes visible to everyone.

Full Size Render by Rosalinde Reece. © 2016 Rosalinde Reece. All Rights Reserved.My website: Rosalinde Reece
My FB art page: Rosalinde Reece, Fine Artist