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3 Tips from Chuck Rosenthal Fine Artist

Being a good painter is not done because of accidents. You need to pass through lots of challenges, trials, practices, and failures. To help you in painting, here are Chuck Rosenthal Fine Artist three simple yet valuable tips that you must always remember as you go along your journey in painting.

Light Controls Everything

You must have been thinking of the best materials to use in painting and must have bought very expensive ones just to be sure to have a great outcome. However, the expensive items will turn out to be worthless if you cannot imagine how the lighting will be on your painting. You must understand that everything in the painting depends mostly on light. The absence and the presence of it control everything. Light provides glow to your painting. The objects will appear gloriously with the appropriate lightings. Using the best angle for lighting, the viewers will experience a very tremendous impact. This is the first thing noticed by viewers and this entices them to look closely and longer at the painting. Your work will not appear dramatic as it is, not until you will paint the right light within it.

Color Matters Greatly

Colors highly influence the overall impact of the painting. There are pieces wherein the color enhances the message to make it clearer. It can describe a scene that other aspects find hard to show. The color used in painting plays a major role. It can harmonize, it unifies a scene, it produces rhythm, it shows a clear visual path, and it creates emphasis. The colors can be greatly shown using the right kinds of brush as well and the appropriate strokes. The best way to understand the value of colors, and how to use them in a painting, is by studying and practicing what the different colors are and what will happen if colors are mixed up. You can learn different combinations of the color wheel and try new ideas for color combinations in your paintings.

Aim to Improve

There is no such thing as steady best painter. All painters grow with each new painting. If you can’t seem to get a particular effect that you want, practice till you get it. Keep learning – read books, watch videos on Youtube, look up definitions of words so that you understand – it’s a continuous process. When you achieve a painting that is the best one you have ever made up, try to surpass that quality. Aim higher. Compete with yourself.

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Chuck Rosenthal Six Techniques for Still Life Oil Painting

Chuck Rosenthal FIne Art copyright 2020 All Rights Reserved

If you want to create a good painting, you must be very careful with the details, especially if you plan to make still life oil painting. Here I will introduce to you the techniques on how to make your painting satisfying in the end.

1. Take time to examine your object.

You must lay put your object in the right place with the correct lighting. If needed, you can make a setup box with a side hole to enable little light to pass through. You can also take photographs of the object so you can examine it clearly to ensure you have just the right lighting effect that you wish. With Still Life painting, do not rush this process.

2. Use a pencil to begin.

A smart move to do before applying oil paint is to make a fairly detailed pencil drawing. This is where you can freely adjust the measurements of the object you want to paint. You can use rulers to measure distance and size. Just remember to remove the excess lines that are not needed in the final drawing since the graphite might contaminate the oil paint.

3. Diluted Oil Paint

To create a still life painting of objects, you must first fill in the backgrounds instead of making the object first using a diluted oil paint. This is because if you do otherwise, the object might seem to float. You can use a soft-haired brush to create a film background layer. You can also use the same oil paint for the objects.

4. Undiluted Paint

After the layer using diluted oil paint, you may now use undiluted oil paint using colors that are quite similar to the diluted oil paint you have used. This is used to remove unwanted brush strokes to create a smoother effect. You can add more details to this part then. You can use a palette knife and coarse brushes if you want to create a thick paint, where necessary. You must remember not to continue with this new layer without drying the previous layer.

5. Add the final layer.

You need to build up liquidity and transparency to the painting so you must add a lot of mediums into it. It will result to subtle gradients. You can use ½-alkyd medium in combination of ½ linseed oil.

6. Final Retouch

You can add retouching glossy varnish to finish your work of art. However, remember to wait after a week of drying your painting before applying this layer. Once you apply the glossy varnish, the next one need to be applied after 6 months or so. This enables the surface quality to regain its original look.

These techniques will surely make your work of art amazing in the end. You just have to follow it carefully. When you get practice with the different techniques, you can expect to have great results. When you have it, you will grow more as an artist.

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Chuck Rosenthal Fine Art – New Availability

The beautiful paintings by artist Chuck Rosenthal certainly inspire a longing to have one framed and hanging in your living room. Known for his masterly use of light, his seascapes, landscapes, people and still life are all desirable. But for many of us, owning an original has been more than our budgets could afford.

Now a new line is being offered of Mr. Rosenthal’s light-filled canvasses. Giclee prints on canvas are available at a fraction of the cost of an original painting.

First, let’s define “giclee.” It is pronounced “gee-clay” and is from a French word that means spray. A giclee reproduction of an artwork is basically an ink jet digital print usually on watercolor paper or canvas. The process uses archival inks, which basically means it won’t fade for a hundred years or more. Great care is taken in the process to produce the exact colors of the original painting. So, down to brass tacks, a giclee reproduction is high quality inks printed on a high quality surface, and is the best you can get in artwork reproduction.

However, since it is a reproduction, not an original, it becomes more available for the rest of us that didn’t figure in several thousand dollars in our financial planning for the purchase of artwork. Hooray!

Mr. Rosenthal has made available many of his pastel paintings in giclee reproductions.  The still life is grapes and apples, but more importantly it is a play of light in yellows, light greens and oranges that is a feast for the eye. The contrasting dark background and the contrast of the smooth grapes and apples against the rough cloth they lie on is very pleasing scene for any room.

There are several seascapes available, most notably a scene of bright evening sun on waders in the shallow water of the beach, with tall condos and hotels in the background.  Since the artist is from Clearwater, Florida, one assumes this is Clearwater Beach, but it could be any of many Gulf beaches. The scene evokes a sort of peace and joy.

Another notable beach scene is of the old drawbridge and causeway to Clearwater Beach.  The rendering of the sky in this painting is just brilliant. The artist has totally mastered the realism of a Clearwater sky.

There are a dozen other paintings to choose from now that giclees have been released, and since the cost now falls within anyone’s budget, a Chuck Rosenthal painting could soon adorn a wall at your home.

Artist Chuck Rosenthal is recognized for his masterly use of light. His striking still lifes, seascapes and landscapes would enhance any room.

There’s one magnificent still life. The contrasts in this painting are fascinating – the dark background for the bright orange, green and yellow apples and grapes, and the smooth fruit against the rough cloth and basket. A nice addition for any wall.

One painting is most obviously Clearwater. The light of a beautiful Clearwater morning sky leaves the old drawbridge and causeway to Clearwater Beach in blue shadow while the water reflects bright light and colors.

Brighten your home with a masterly painting!

>> Go here to see the Chuck Rosenthal Fine Artist Gallery

 

 

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Chuck Rosenthal Fine Artist

Chuck Rosenthal Fine ArtistI started studying art in 1963 with an extraordinary illustrator/fine artist named Morton Roberts at the National Academy of Design in NYC. I soon forgot about commercial art. Roberts fired up my desire to paint and succeed as a fine artist and I have never really left that path. But I did change my viewpoint on style and content. Roberts untimely death was a huge tragedy and a great disappointment for me because I believed he had so much to teach. Roberts was followed by abstract artist, Hugh Gumpel and under Hugh I won the Dr. Al Weil student prize at the National Academy. Eventually I began to look around for another teacher and found Daniel Greene, an outstanding portrait painter and studied with him for the next couple of years. Dan helped me to get a scholarship membership in the Salmagundi Club where I managed to gain an honorable mention in their scholarship members’ exhibition and competition.

Pears with Black Grapes fine art by Chuck RosenthalDuring this time I became aware of and became an intense admirer of the work of still-life artist and portrait painter David Leffel. I sought to present my images in a similar light. I actually studied with Leffel for a couple of months in his New York City studio, but it wasn’t enough time to grasp where he was coming from and how he made his decisions and drew his conclusions, so I pretty much had to teach myself.

Pears with Black Grapes Still Life by Chuck RosenthalTechnique had always been very important to me and I originally did dead-color preparations for my paintings, much as the Old Masters did (dead-color paintings are monochromatic paintings over which colors are glazed), but I became more interested in tonal results rather than the sculptural results achieved by 17th century painters. I was probably somewhat influenced by Impressionism and definitely by modern-day tonalist work. I have become fascinated with the effects of light, particularly as an object emerges from shadow into light. I seek to represent what I see, to the best of my ability, in terms of light and atmosphere.

I have managed to achieve some degree of artistic success. In 2010 I was accepted as a member of the Oil Painters of America and was a finalist in American Artist Magazine’s annual cover competition.

Find out more about Chuck Rosenthal at Chuck Rosenthal Fine Art